JAN Trust is a multi-award winning charity empowering and providing leadership for women in order to create positive and active citizens of society

Press coverage - Mirror

The Mirror published a piece on our Director's 7/7 near death experience and the tireless work she has been carrying out since then with grass roots communities. The article can be found here as well as below:

I survived the 7/7 bombings and now I work to stop young people being drawn into extremism

That tube shouldn’t have been my tube, but I was running late. I worked in investment banking and I did that journey on the Piccadilly line every single day.

My routine was, without fail, to get on the first carriage. But that day I got on in the middle of the train. Had I got on my usual carriage, I may not be here today – that was the one Germaine Lindsay blew up with his bomb.

That fateful day

It was rush hour so the train was packed. It left Kings Cross and 10 seconds into the tunnel, it happened. A massive explosion, the biggest bang I’ve ever heard.

The whole train shook, everyone fell forward, it went dark and the emergency lights kicked in. Smoke started to fill the carriage and it was hard to breathe, so I took my jacket off to make a veil. People were screaming and trying to break the glass to escape but I was just frozen in shock.

It didn’t even cross my mind that it might be a bomb. I thought we’d derailed and my mind was racing, thinking, "Another train is going to crash into us and there’ll be a fireball and we’re going to burn to death".

I was preparing myself to die. My thoughts went to growing up, my family, my life was flashing in front of my eyes. I hadn’t said goodbye to my loved ones, I hadn’t got married, had children or travelled the world.

We were down there 40 minutes, but it felt like a lifetime. Eventually I heard the distant voice of a policeman saying, "We’re coming to get you". 

My heart had felt as if it was being strangled with a tight rope, and straight away the rope loosened. The police got us out of the carriage and escorted us down the tunnel and out of the station. It felt eerie. 

The emergency services were attending to the seriously injured, so the rest of us were left to our own devices. There were crowds everywhere and I remember thinking, "What the hell are you staring at?" I went across the road to McDonald’s, ran into the toilets and broke down.

I looked in the mirror and I was black from the smoke. I cleaned myself up and tried to call my mum, but the phone lines were down. There was no transport so I had to walk home to Haringey, in North London. 

I ran into my house, locked the door, closed the curtains and curled up on the sofa, waiting for my family to come and console me. I couldn’t turn on the news until the evening, and that’s when I found out it was a bomb.

It shook me, and knowing it was Muslim men shook me further. Being a Muslim, I know it clearly states in the Quran that if you take one innocent life, it’s as though you have taken the whole of humanity. What they did does not represent Islam.

I had to be signed off work, I couldn’t travel on the tube. I needed counselling, and a lot of family support got me through. When I went back to work six months later I was like a robot – my heart and mind were somewhere else. 

I had questions. Why would anyone do this? What could have been done to prevent it? What about the parents of the bombers? They gave birth to them, they wanted the best for them, they would not have wanted their children to take innocent lives. That’s when my life changed.

Making a difference

Not only did I decide to get married and have children – I now have two daughters, aged six and two – I turned my back on my career. I could have continued working my way up and earned lots of money, but I wasn’t happy. I wanted to make a difference. 

I started working with a charity called the JAN Trust, which helps marginalised, vulnerable women to lead more independent lives. I came on board to make a difference on the issue of extremism, working with mothers of young Muslims. 

Some of these women have never switched on a computer, so we teach them to go online and expose them to the issues of radicalisation. A lot of them don’t speak English and will often only be watching TV from their own country, so they can be unaware – during one session, we found that, around the time of the beheadings, only 4% of the women knew who ISIS were.

It’s so important to educate those who can make a difference. We give them the skills to challenge their children’s grievances in a positive way, so, let’s say they’re angry about the air strikes, how do they get their voices heard in a democratic way? 

We also work with schools. I’ve met students who sympathise with the 7/7 bombers. I told them my story, and put it into perspective – I could have been their sister, it was an indiscriminate attack against everyone, not just non-Muslims. We work with teachers too, as they have a duty to report radicalisation, and they’re feeling overwhelmed and ill-equipped to deal with it.

Often what causes young people to be radicalised is challenging their grievances in the wrong way, but there are also the issues of alienation and high unemployment among young Muslims. The rise of Islamaphobia feeds into radicalisation too. They’re manipulated through chat rooms and social media.

Everything that’s happened since 7/7, such as the Paris attacks and the American shootings, is disheartening and worrying, but we’re making a difference on a grass-roots level. Changing one person’s mind can be enough to stop an act of terrorism.

The effects of what happened to me are still with me. I have to get on the tube for meetings, but I couldn’t do it day to day, and on the tenth anniversary, my husband told me I was screaming about the tube in my sleep. 

I think about it every day. But everything happened for a reason and that day turned my life around. It strengthened my faith because it felt like an attack on Islam, thanks to the knock-on effect of Islamaphobia.

I’ve had death threats, my property vandalised, been told, "I’m going to slit your Muslim throat". I’ve feared for my life and my family want me to take a step back, but then they’ve won. They’re trying to break me down but I’m never, ever going to let that happen.

● 700 people were injured and 56, including the four terrorists, died in the 7/7 bombings. Germaine Lindsay killed 26 of them on the train Sajda was travelling on in Kings Cross. It was the deadliest single act of terrorism in the UK since the Lockerbie bombing, and the deadliest bombing in London since World War Two.

● The JAN Trust is an award-winning women’s charity providing support and assistance to vulnerable, marginalised women across the UK. Their services range from raising awareness and preventing violence against women and girls through to developing skills for empowerment and integration.

● In a study, 92% of the Muslim mothers JAN worked with had no understanding of what radicalisation is, according to research conducted by the JAN Trust’s Web Guardians(c) programme.

● In the last three years there has been a 65% increase in the number of Muslim women reporting Islamophobic incidents. The day after the Paris attacks, the JAN Trust received 15 reports of Islamophobia within an hour from Muslim women. The youngest victim of Islamophobia supported by the JAN Trust has been a seven-year-old girl.

To support JAN Trust, visit jantrust.org

Published 17th January 2016

JAN Trust in Press

The BBC News quoted our Director, Sajda Mughal OBE following the Prime Ministers annoucement of English language skills and Muslim women. The article can be found here and her comments are below:

Access difficulties

Sajda Mughal, director of the London-based Jan Trust which works to empower vulnerable women, says there is indeed an issue among Muslim women living in the UK who are unable to speak English.

"Currently 200 women come to our centre each week, 80% of which are Muslim. Of these, 70% cannot speak English or are very poor at it. Some have English as a fourth or fifth language. Some are even illiterate in their own language.

"It's heartening to hear the prime minister is providing this language funding but it should trickle down to grass-roots organisations and not just be given to bigger ones like colleges.

"We have large numbers of women who say they have been turned away from colleges because they need very basic lessons and are told the colleges don't provide that level."

Published 18th January 2016

Worthy Cause for Prime Minister

The Evening Standard wrote about JAN Trust and the dire funding crisis it faces. The article can be found here and below:

A worthy cause for a concerned Prime Minister by Rosamund Urwin

This week, David Cameron proclaimed a need to help Muslim women. He says they must all speak English. He wants to end forced marriage. He argues a lack of integration helps foster extremism. 

Well, there’s a charity in north London, JAN Trust, that should seem like a panacea then. It holds language classes. It helps those who’ve been compelled into marriage. It combats extremism by teaching mothers to identify signs of radicalisation, as well as computer skills so they understand what their children are up to online. It’s also set to close on March 31. 

Thanks in part to Government cuts, charities like JAN Trust face growing competition for the scraps philanthropic organisations can spare. But as Cameron was surely acknowledging, the cost of not helping these women is far higher. Rather than grandstanding, shouldn’t he make himself the saviour of JAN Trust?

Published 21st January 2016

OBE Award

Our Director, Sajda Mughal, was awarded with an OBE in the Queens New Years Honours List 2015 for her work at JAN Trust and towards community cohesion

This award was covered by press including the Tottenham and Wood Green Independent and the Tottenham and Wood Green Journal.

To view the Tottenham and Wood Green Independent article:


Released Monday 5th January 2015

JAN Trust in Press

Zarina was born in Pakistan and came to the UK 23 years ago to join her husband, who already lived here. He was also her cousin. Zarina says there is a long tradition of marrying within the family.Recently the Evening Standard spoke to a forced marriage perpetrator (Pakistani mother) who has forced her daughter from the UK to Pakistani to marry a man against her will. Her daughter was put through mental and physical abuse. We assisted and supported the victim and changed the mind sets of the mother and father. The mother reflects back on what she did and thoroughly regrets her actions. The article is below and can be read here: CLICK HERE

A mother’s tale of regret: I feel devastated that I forced my daughter to marry for ‘honour’...nobody should do it

Tomorrow London hosts the world’s first Girl Summit, aimed at ending FGM and forced marriage. Rosamund Urwin hears one mother’s tale of regret, and of how she finally put her child first.

In 2006, Zarina* and her husband took their 16-year-old daughter to Pakistan. They told her they were going to visit their extended family; their daughter, who grew up in north London, had never been to her ancestral homeland, nor met her grandparents. But in reality, she was being taken there to marry her cousin, the son of Zarina’s brother.

“We fooled her,” Zarina admits. “We thought she should settle down. In the culture in this country, people inter-marry, and it’s quite open [whom you pick as a partner] — I wanted my daughter to escape that. We were worried that she would have boyfriends. So we decided that she should marry in the family, to keep the honour within the family, and to say that she couldn’t challenge us, that she must do what the elders are telling her.”

Zarina has never spoken about this before, and has asked for her identity to be disguised, because she fears reprisals from her community for speaking up. When we meet, she’s wearing the niqab in a colourful and intricate print. She speaks to me through a translator, as her English is limited, but there’s a word I keep hearing: “izzat”, which means “honour” in Urdu.

Zarina was born in Pakistan and came to the UK 23 years ago to join her husband, who already lived here. He was also her cousin. Zarina says there is a long tradition of marrying within the family.

“It’s been going on for centuries — and we didn’t want to break that,” she says. “Because there was a young boy in the family, we wanted to get her settled [married] with him, and then bring him back here. If she had married someone outside the family, there would have been a complete commotion — it would be like breaking the whole family structure.”

When her daughter discovered what was happening, she was devastated. “My daughter was crying constantly,” Zarina recalls. “She was very obstinate that she didn’t want to marry. She said she was brought up in the west and that she can’t marry a man she hasn’t seen, and even if she had seen him, she is not interested.” Her daughter also felt that their backgrounds were too different. “She felt it was a village culture there.”

Zarina admits she assaulted her daughter in order to force her to marry this man. The future in-laws were also physically abusive. “My daughter said this wasn’t her choice, but as soon as she said that we oppressed her by really hitting her and abusing her. We used violence against her, as well as emotional abuse, pressurising her — ‘You must do it’. Our aim was to get her married, come hell or high water. With all this force, the marriage went ahead.”

Zarina’s younger daughter had also travelled to Pakistan and was very disturbed by what was happening.

After the wedding, the family returned to London to make arrangements with immigration officials for the groom to come here. “When we got back, we told [our daughter] that she couldn’t have any friends. She should be isolated so she couldn’t talk or get support from anyone.”

Instead, Zarina’s daughter contacted the JAN Trust, a charity that has worked with immigrant communities for 25 years and campaigns to end forced marriage. “When she got back, she

was very upset and unhappy. But because she was brought up here, she found out through the internet how to get support.”

After the girl approached JAN, Sajda Mughal, the charity’s project director, contacted Zarina. Initially, Zarina was very angry: “We didn’t want anyone to know that this [forced marriage] took place. We were very unhappy about what she had done.”

But Zarina, who also came to the JAN centre, near Alexandra Palace, was eventually won round. The JAN Trust also enlisted the help of an imam, who talked to Zarina and her husband; it is rare for women to get the chance to have a one-on-one discussion with an imam. He explained that forced marriage had nothing to do with Islam, that Zarina and her husband were mistaking tradition for religion.

The discussions — with Zarina and her husband — lasted for more than eight months. Zarina recalls the imam telling her that “forced marriages ruin lives and generations — all on the basis of izzat” and that Mohammed had never said that parents should force their children into marriages: “I have now learned that the children come first, that their happiness comes first, rather than our own aims.” The imam also reinforced the charity’s message that their daughter needed to get a divorce — a “hulla” — and advised them on the steps that had to be taken.

Zarina says she was facing intense pressure from her family in Pakistan: “They said, ‘You have to take our son, he must go and live with you.’ It was a dishonour for them, because it’s a tight-knit community there. When you marry, everyone knows; when there’s a divorce, everyone knows. Everyone was asking them, ‘What happened? What happened?’ They thought it was a disgrace for them. It was all: honour, honour, honour.”

The marriage was eventually made void but, Zarina’s family have been cut off from the rest of their relatives: “The whole circle of the family — uncles, aunts, everybody — has discarded us. They won’t speak to us at all.”

However, their smaller family unit is content again. Zarina’s daughter is now 24 and has just finished studying law: “She’s not talking about marriage at the moment. She’s out of this world happy now.” Her younger sister is also studying, and is relieved that the same fate will not befall her.

Zarina is full of remorse for what happened. “I look back on this time, and I feel devastated that I did this for ‘honour’. I feel very guilty. Nobody should do it. The best thing we did was break  away from this forced marriage — everything else was wrong. Seeing my daughter happy is so wonderful.”

Her husband shares her feelings. “He has changed completely and he really regrets what he did too,” adds Zarina. “He feels like there is nobody above our children when he sees them happy. He says our children come first — before family and before honour.”

She admits, however, that they cannot tell people in their community what happened. “It would be very dangerous if the story got out. People would say, ‘She is divorced’. Our daughter could suffer more — perhaps our family could suffer honour-based violence from the community.”

She is full of praise for the “intense” support of the JAN Trust in combating forced marriage. “Laws have been passed but people are still doing it. We need organ-isations such as the JAN Trust to talk to younger generations and their parents to change mindsets. The way to resolve it is for parents to be educated, and for the younger generation to know their rights. JAN saved my daughter’s life.”

The charity opposed the crim-inalisation of forced marriage because its research suggested it would drive the problem further underground, with victims unwilling to see family members jailed. Does Zarina believe these women and girls would come forward, and risk seeing their parents prosecuted? “No, they would never come forward. No one will say, ‘I am going to be taken,’ because they won’t want their parents in prison.”

The JAN Trust is the only charity in the UK that works with perpetrators. Although men are also forced into marriage, the vast majority (around 90 per cent) of those who contact the JAN Trust are women.

Mughal says: “The only way of getting rid of this practice is to change those mindsets, otherwise we will be chasing our tail. We’d be supporting victims and looking after them, but continually having more victims — year on year, day by day. Why do these victims exist? Because of mindsets that need changing. It’s not going to happen overnight but it’s a drip, drip effect. Eventually we’ll get there.”

Zarina agrees: “The majority of people who carry out these practices are not educated about it. And they are very community-based — they don’t want to open the doors to anyone else. They don’t want to come out of that [way of thinking] — but we did.”

* Zarina’s name has been changed.

For more information about the JAN Trust’s work, go to jantrust.org

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